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Transport Transport  

Different means of transport were obviously vital to the development of the sand industry in and around Leighton Buzzard. To begin with, sand was moved by horse and cart along the roads through the town to be sold for local use, for example by building firms and in tile-making.

 

With the advent of the canal in the early 1800s, there was access to a wider market and carts moved sand from the quarries to be loaded into boats at Arnold’s Wharf, Old Linslade and at Black Bridge near Tiddenfoot. The sand could now be taken south to London or north to the Midlands.

 

Similarly, the coming of the railway in 1838 opened up many more opportunities to transport the sand throughout the country.

 

However, the constant passage of carts through the town caused such damage to the roads that the Council demanded that the sand firms set up an alternative form of transport. This led to the building of the Leighton Buzzard Light Railway in 1919, which became the main means of moving sand from the quarries in the north of the town to the southern outskirts. Here were situated the grading and washing sheds and from here there was easier access to the canal and the mainline railway.

 

Transport by rail declined in the years following the Second World War and was replaced by road haulage. Lorries could deliver faster and more directly and so, from the late 1950s onward, Leighton Buzzard became home to many haulage firms, most of them involved in the transport of sand or of its associated products.

 

 
Canal
Canal
Railway
Railway
Railway
Light Railway
Road
Road
 
 
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